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ReelTalk Movie Reviews
Baroque Eloquence
by Richard Jack Smith

Verily, Powers Boothe could convey volumes with just a look. Itís a quality all worthy character actors share. Sadly, Boothe passed away on May 14, 2017. He was only 68 years old,  and his death was attributed to natural causes.

With those eyes that could speak so well, Boothe empowered films such as Tombstone and Sin City: A Dame to Kill For. In the latter, he gave an inspirational turn as Senator Roark, the target of Jessica Albaís vengeance. During a nightclub sequence, Alba points a gun at him and Boothe does the most remarkable thing. He spots this potential enemy, yet seems unfazed. Does he suspect her true identity? Suffice to say, that enigmatic twinkle in his eyes felt rather cheeky.

Likewise, Boothe elevated a powerful ensemble throughout George P. Cosmatosí Tombstone. As Curly Bill Brocius, self-made leader of the cowboys in red sashes, he delivered many memorable quotes. For example, one drug-fuelled reverie finds him so delirious he fires a gun at the moon. Thatís only the start though.

Even though the films exhibited questionable quality, Boothe lent gravitas to Red Dawn and Sudden Death. It could be said that he was a less than subtle performer, often bearing too much weight on his shoulders. However, such talk misses the point when you consider how eloquent he could be. Regardless, his dedication always shone through.

For investing his craft with such nuances, I shall remember Boothe fondly.

Powers Boothe (1948-2017)


                                                                                                                                                                               
 
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